The Latest

Jul 29, 2014 / 8 notes

Winners of POPCAP’14 Announced

Patrick Willocq is a photographer, who is one of the 5 Winners of POPCAP’14. Patrick won the award for the 2013 series titled, I am Walé Respect Me. For this project, he dove deeply into an initiation ritual of the Ekonda pygmies in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The Ekondas believe that the most important moment in the life of a woman is the birth of her first child.

The young mother (usually 15 to 18) is called Walé (“primiparous nursing mother“). She returns to her parents where she remains secluded for a period of 2 to 5 years. During her seclusion, a Walé is under very special care. She must also respect a taboo on sex during the whole period and is given a similar status to that of a patriarch. The end of her seclusion is marked by a dancing and singing ritual. The choreography and the songs have a very codified structure but also contain unique qualities specific to each Walé. She sings the story of her own loneliness, and with humor praises her own behavior while discrediting her Walé rivals.

This series is a personal reflection of women in general and the Walé ritual specifically. But first and foremost, it is the result of a unique collaboration with young pygmy women, their respective clans, an ethnomusicologist, an artist and many artisans of the forest. Working together, our mutual experiences become richer giving birth to “I am Walé Respect Me”.

Join African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks (AADAT)
on Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | Pinterest | ART SHOP

Jul 29, 2014 / 9 notes


Winners of POPCAP’14 Announced

Ilan Godfrey is a photographer from The Netherlands, who is one of the 5 Winners of POPCAP’14. Ilan won the award for the 2011-13 series titled, Legacy of the Mine.

For more than a century, South Africa’s demand for gold, diamonds, coal and platinum has gone from strength to strength, often shifting in accordance with the political economy and the availability of foreign markets. Mineral exploitation by means of cheap and disposable labour has brought about national economic growth, making the mining industry the largest industrial sector in South Africa. Recognised globally for its abundance and variety of mineral resources, which account for a significant proportion of world production and reserves.

‘The mine’, irrespective of the particular minerals extracted, is central in understanding societal change across the country and evidently comparable to mining concerns around the world. This enabled me to channel my conception of ‘the mine’ into visual representations that gave agency to these forgotten communities. The countless stories of personal suffering are brought to the surface and the legacy of ‘the mine’ is revealed.

Join African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks (AADAT)
on Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | Pinterest | ART SHOP

Jul 29, 2014 / 17 notes

The Beginner’s Guide to Contemporary African Art

African art has certainly taken a turn for the better with a growing interest in the field, and an increasing number of art fairs, biennials, exhibitions, galleries and platforms which showcase African art. Here on AADAT we’ve been talking a lot about African art, African contemporary art, and art of the African diaspora. But have you wondered how art is even defined as African contemporary art? What does it mean? Well, don’t be shy to ask. You’re not alone. 

Read More

Join African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks (AADAT)
on Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | Pinterest | ART SHOP

Jul 29, 2014 / 13 notes


Winners of POPCAP’14 Announced

Ilan Godfrey is a photographer from The Netherlands, who is one of the 5 Winners of POPCAP’14. Ilan won the award for the 2011-13 series titled, Legacy of the Mine.

For more than a century, South Africa’s demand for gold, diamonds, coal and platinum has gone from strength to strength, often shifting in accordance with the political economy and the availability of foreign markets. Mineral exploitation by means of cheap and disposable labour has brought about national economic growth, making the mining industry the largest industrial sector in South Africa. Recognised globally for its abundance and variety of mineral resources, which account for a significant proportion of world production and reserves.

‘The mine’, irrespective of the particular minerals extracted, is central in understanding societal change across the country and evidently comparable to mining concerns around the world. This enabled me to channel my conception of ‘the mine’ into visual representations that gave agency to these forgotten communities. The countless stories of personal suffering are brought to the surface and the legacy of ‘the mine’ is revealed.

Join African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks (AADAT)
on Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | Pinterest | ART SHOP

Jul 29, 2014 / 20 notes


Winners of POPCAP’14 Announced

Léonard Pongo is a photographer from Belgium, who is one of the 5 Winners of POPCAP’14. Léonard won the award for the 2013 series titled, The Uncanny.

"The Uncanny" is a documentary project conducted in Congo DR in the provinces of Kinshasa, Bas-Congo, Bandundu, Kasaï, and Katanga since the political elections of Fall 2011. It was carried out by accompanying family members, political personalities, religious leaders and local TV in order to document the events that rhythm the life of the country‘s inhabitant and try to understand the congolese society and accidentally recovering part of my own identity.

This story brings a vision of the country experienced from within. It tries to show the collateral impact of the war instead of the direct hits. My need to see my country from a different point of view than the often depicted crises, combined with the openness of people to share their most intimate moments with me, and my willingness to be accepted as part of their lives, allowed me to depict my country intimately and subjectively, not trying to deliver a truth, but striving to understand people‘s realities and to reconstruct my own.

Join African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks (AADAT)
on Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | Pinterest | ART SHOP

ofoesaysit:

Ghana, My Home

Waiting to go to Sirigu, Upper East Region

Photography by Ofoe Amegavie, 2014
Jul 29, 2014 / 24 notes

ofoesaysit:

Ghana, My Home

Waiting to go to Sirigu, Upper East Region

Photography by Ofoe Amegavie, 2014

Jul 29, 2014 / 17 notes

Winners of POPCAP’14 Announced

Patrick Willocq is a photographer, who is one of the 5 Winners of POPCAP’14. Patrick won the award for the 2013 series titled, I am Walé Respect Me. For this project, he dove deeply into an initiation ritual of the Ekonda pygmies in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The Ekondas believe that the most important moment in the life of a woman is the birth of her first child.

The young mother (usually 15 to 18) is called Walé (“primiparous nursing mother“). She returns to her parents where she remains secluded for a period of 2 to 5 years. During her seclusion, a Walé is under very special care. She must also respect a taboo on sex during the whole period and is given a similar status to that of a patriarch. The end of her seclusion is marked by a dancing and singing ritual. The choreography and the songs have a very codified structure but also contain unique qualities specific to each Walé. She sings the story of her own loneliness, and with humor praises her own behavior while discrediting her Walé rivals.

This series is a personal reflection of women in general and the Walé ritual specifically. But first and foremost, it is the result of a unique collaboration with young pygmy women, their respective clans, an ethnomusicologist, an artist and many artisans of the forest. Working together, our mutual experiences become richer giving birth to “I am Walé Respect Me”.

Join African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks (AADAT)
on Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | Pinterest | ART SHOP

Jul 29, 2014 / 9 notes

Winners of POPCAP’14 Announced

Anoek Steketee is a photographer from The Netherlands, who is one of the 5 Winners of POPCAP’14. Anoek won the award for the 2014 series titled, Love Radio.

Set in Rwanda, Love Radio – Episodes of love and hate, is a multimedia project about the complex process of reconciliation, based on a popular radio soap. The story line in Musekeweya takes place in Muhumuro and Bumanzi, two fictional villages that hate each other’s guts. Musekeweya seems to be a fairly normal soap at first, full of romances, intrigues and villains with resounding names like Rutaganira and Zaninka. The love between Shema en Batamuriza is like a Rwandan ‘Romeo and Juliet’.

But there is a major difference: the soap is supposed to do more than just entertain; it is also intended to convey to listeners how violence begins and how it can be prevented. While the radio show has an idealistic premise, this project also raises some questions. Can fiction get people to reconcile? Or is this positive voice merely a veneer in a country still coping with the traumas of the genocide? And what does reconciliation actually mean?

Join African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks (AADAT)
on Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | Pinterest | ART SHOP

Jul 29, 2014 / 33 notes

Winners of POPCAP’14 Announced

Joana Choumali is a photographer from Ivory Coast, who is one of the 5 Winners of POPCAP’14. She won the award for her 2013 series titled, Hââbré, The Last Generation.

Hââbré is the same word for writing / scarification” in Kô language from Burkina faso. Scarification is the practice of performing a superficial incision in the human skin. This practice is disappearing due to the pressure of religious and state authorities, urban practices and the introduction of clothing in tribes. Nowadays, only the older people wear scarifications. This series of portraits lead us to question the link between past and present, and self-image depending on a given environment. Opinions (sometimes conflicting) of our witnesses illustrate the complexity of African identity today in a contemporary Africa torn between its past and its future. This “last generation” of people bearing the imprint of the past on their faces, went from being the norm and having a high social value to being somewhat “excluded”. They are the last witnesses of an Africa of a bygone era.

Join African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks (AADAT) on Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | Pinterest | ART SHOP

AADAT’s Jessica Lynne and the rest of the Zora Magazine team in collaboration with NY Writers Coalition put on an incredible event last week to explore the ways in which black women, as Audre Lorde notes, “have traveled through the dominions of anger.” 
Click out all the tweets and images from the event HERE
Jul 28, 2014 / 3 notes

AADAT’s Jessica Lynne and the rest of the Zora Magazine team in collaboration with NY Writers Coalition put on an incredible event last week to explore the ways in which black women, as Audre Lorde notes, “have traveled through the dominions of anger.” 

Click out all the tweets and images from the event HERE

We teamed up with South African illustrator Thandiwe Tshabalala, creator of the Setswana ABC’s and Xhosa ABC’s, to bring you a series of art prints for purchase in our shop, A! Marketplace.
Check out our interview with Thandiwe in which she explains the series.
—
Join African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks (AADAT) on Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | Pinterest | ART SHOP
Jul 27, 2014 / 1 note

We teamed up with South African illustrator Thandiwe Tshabalala, creator of the Setswana ABC’s and Xhosa ABC’s, to bring you a series of art prints for purchase in our shop, A! Marketplace.

Check out our interview with Thandiwe in which she explains the series.

Join African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks (AADAT) on Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | Pinterest | ART SHOP

Jul 27, 2014 / 3 notes

We teamed up with South African illustrator Thandiwe Tshabalala, creator of the Setswana ABC’s and Xhosa ABC’s, to bring you a series of art prints for purchase in our shop, A! Marketplace.

Check out our interview with Thandiwe in which she explains the series.

Join African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks (AADAT) on Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | Pinterest | ART SHOP

Jul 26, 2014 / 3 notes

We teamed up with South African illustrator Thandiwe Tshabalala, creator of the Setswana ABC’s and Xhosa ABC’s, to bring you a series of art prints for purchase in our shop, A! Marketplace.

Check out our interview with Thandiwe in which she explains the series.

Join African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks (AADAT) on Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | Pinterest | ART SHOP

Jul 26, 2014 / 5 notes

Top: Freedom; Directed by Shane Vermooten; South Africa; 2013; 22 min

Bottom: Madama Esther; Directed by: Razanajaona Luck; Madagascar; 2013; 16 min

Both films are part of this year’s selection for the 35th Durban Film Festival. Watch these and other short films here.

Join African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks (AADAT) on Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | Pinterest | ART SHOP

Jul 25, 2014 / 8 notes

Top: Thula; James Bland; South Africa, United States; 2013; 16 min

Bottom: No Love Lost; Directed by Shekhar Bassi; United Kingdom; 2013; 15 min

Both films are part of this year’s selection for the 35th Durban Film Festival. Watch these and other short films here.

Join African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks (AADAT) on Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | Pinterest | ART SHOP